Coronavirus

Explaining the Coronavirus to Your Kids

With statewide business and school closures due to COVID-19, your kids may have questions about what’s going on. One registered play therapist shares some tips about how to have this conversation with the young ones.
“For adults and parents, they might be nervous about the coronavirus as well but it’s important to take their own fears and be able to put those aside for the time being while they’re with their child,“ said Amy Romero.
Explaining a global pandemic to your child can be a little scary, but Registered Play Therapist Amy Romero says it can be easier comparing it to something they are familiar with.
Amy said, “It’s not the flu it’s very different than the flu, but connecting it to what they already know. And so to teach the child good hygiene, washing your hands these are ways that we can keep from getting the coronavirus.“
Though most people are working from home, Amy feels parents should schedule play time and make their kids feel like they have a role in fighting the coronavirus.
“So we’re part of a team. We’re in this together and that can really help them I feel like they’re doing their part that they have control over something. They can wash their hands, they can sing their ABC’s while they’re washing their hands, I would make it fun!” said Amy.
And if your kids won’t listen to you, Amy advises getting some help from their favorite characters!
Amy said, “Elsa I mean what kid doesn’t listen to Elsa?!”
“And if you have to cough, cough into your elbow like this. This keeps us from spreading germs on door knobs and countertops and things that people often touch,” said Queen Elsa.
Amy partnered up with the Disney princess, to help parents explain the coronavirus to kids.
In a script, Elsa said, “The point of these closures is to help us fight the coronavirus and stop it from spreading. Grown-ups all around the world are working hard to fight the coronavirus. Your part in all of this is to just be a kid.”
“We have these adult concerns that are unpredictable but yet we do have control over some things in our life still,” added Amy.
Amy says for older kids and teens it’s important to provide the facts about the virus since many of these impressionable minds are exposed to false reports on social media. You can watch Elsa’s full video here. For more information about Amy and the services she provides click here.